Inside DC’s New Restaurant

a goat with its tail up

Growing up in the US Virgin Islands, which is overrun with goats and sheep, co-owner Jill Tyler was told how to tell the difference between the two: “Tail up goat. Tail down sheep.”

Earlier this month, a new restaurant opened on 1827 Adams Mill Road, near some luxury condos: Tail Up Goat, a place that served Mediterranean-inspired food.  The place is the result of a team of four working together: Jon Sybert and Bill Jensen of Komi fame and former Little Serow service director Jill Tyler.  Kevin Doyle, the young restauranteur who cut his teeth with Del Campo, is an investor.  Before the restaurant even opened, Tail Up Goat has earned write ups from the Washington Post and City Paper.  None of the people involved have owned a restaurant before, and there’s no PR person hyping the place up, but every food nut in DC has been clawing to get into the door.

Tail Up Goat is one of those places that’s great for anybody without concern for money or waistlines.  Yet even if you’ve never been here before, the staff is able to make you feel welcome.  There’s no chef tasting menu here, just carefully-made dishes with a strong Mediterranean influence, designed to share.  Even if it hasn’t been opened for that long, it’s already becoming an old neighborhood institution with its homey and relaxed feel.  It’s great for those who love carbs, and the house breads and pastas are something to write home about.  Some breads include a charred chocolate rye and a sourdough with bits of seaweed.  Instead of finding their way into the bread basket, these breads showcase a variety of toppings and vegetables.  Pastas provide the chance for some exciting flavor combos: octopus ragu and rutabaga ravioli, just to name a few.

There are only four different entrees at Tail Up Goat, two of which are designed for sharing: a whole stuffed fish and lamb ribs topped with yogurt, onions, citrus and fresh herbs.  The desserts, if you have room for them, are absolutely worth checking out.  The cocktails are also ideal for washing everything down: one notary is the roasted pineapple float made with the Mexican fermented pineapple drink tepache.